FERPA AND STUDENT PRIVACY

Ewa Makai Middle School works hard to ensure we are FERPA, CIPA and COPPA compliant. Learn more about what that means below.

 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

What is ferpa?

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a federal law that gives parents certain protections with regard to their children’s education records, such as report cards, transcripts, disciplinary records, contact and family information, and class schedules. As a parent, you have the right to review your child’s education records and to request changes under limited circumstances.

Each year, Hawaii public schools are required to notify parents of their rights under FERPA. These rights are generally broken into four sections. Here is a brief description of FERPA rights:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the request.

  2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the parent, guardian, or eligible student believe are inaccurate or misleading.

  3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception that permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests.

  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the school to comply with the requirements of FERPA.

Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA)

CIPA was enacted by Congress in 2000 to address concerns about children’s access to obscene or harmful content over the Internet. CIPA imposes certain requirements on schools or libraries that receive discounts for Internet access or internal connections through the E-rate program. Read Additional Information Here.

Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA)

The primary goal of COPPA is to place parents in control over what information is collected from their young children online. COPPA was designed to protect children under age 13 while accounting for the dynamic nature of the Internet. The Rule applies to operators of commercial websites and online services (including mobile apps) directed to children under 13 that collect, use, or disclose personal information from children, and operators of general audience websites or online services with actual knowledge that they are collecting, using, or disclosing personal information from children under 13. The Rule also applies to websites or online services that have actual knowledge that they are collecting personal information directly from users of another website or online service directed to children. Want more information? Check the most Frequently Asked Questions Here.